The united states need to adopt universal health care

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract The purpose of this research paper is to compare health care systems in three highly advanced industrialized countries: The first part of the research paper will focus on the description of health care systems in the above-mentioned countries while the second part will analyze, evaluate and compare the three systems regarding equity and efficiency. Finally, an overview of recent changes and proposed future reforms in these countries will be provided as well.

The united states need to adopt universal health care

Messenger The lead-up to the House passage of the American Health Care Act AHCA on May 4, which passed by a narrow majority after a failed first attempt, provided a glimpse into just how difficult it is to gain consensus on health care coverage.

In the aftermath of the House vote, many people have asked: Why are politicians struggling to find consensus on the AHCA instead of pursuing universal coverage? After all, most advanced industrialized countries have universal health care.

As a health policy and politics scholar, I have some ideas. Research from political science and health services points to three explanations. American culture is unique One key reason is the unique political culture in America. As a nation that began on the back of immigrants with an entrepreneurial spirit and without a feudal system to ingrain a rigid social structure, Americans are more likely to be individualistic.

In other words, Americans, and conservatives in particular, have a strong belief in classical liberalism and the idea that the government should play a limited role in society. Given that universal coverage inherently clashes with this belief in individualism and limited government, it is perhaps not surprising that it has never been enacted in America even as it has been enacted elsewhere.

Public opinion certainly supports this idea.

Big Issues

Survey research conducted by the International Social Survey Program has found that a lower percentage of Americans believe health care for the sick is a government responsibility than individuals in other advanced countries like Canada, the U.

Another factor that has limited debate about national health insurance is the role of interest groups in influencing the political process.

While recent reports suggest strong opposition from interest groups to the AHCA, it is worth noting that even when confronted with a bill that many organized interests view as bad policy, universal health care has not been brought up as an alternative.

As policy experts have pointed out in studies of the U. Universal coverage unlikely to happen Ultimately, the United States remains one of the only advanced industrialized nations without a comprehensive national health insurance system and with little prospect for one developing under President Trump or even subsequent presidents because of the many ways America is exceptional.

Its culture is unusually individualistic, favoring personal over government responsibility; lobbyists are particularly active, spending billions to ensure that private insurers maintain their status in the health system; and our institutions are designed in a manner that limits major social policy changes from happening.

As long as the reasons above remain, there is little reason to expect universal coverage in America anytime soon.Feb 12,  · Comparisons of Health Care Systems in the United States, Germany and Canada nor do they necessarily imply that the United States should adopt the Canadian or German approach.

Their health care systems provide nearly universal access to medical care services and involve a greater financing and regulatory role for the federal. Should the US Adopt a National Health Care Plan? GUJHS. April; Vol. 1, No. 3. and as millions continue to be denied the care they need, the question arises as to whether or not legislation should be passed to institutionalize a government-funded, universal health care program in the United States.

The United States Should Adopt.

The united states need to adopt universal health care

Dec 13,  · So, the government must adopt universal health care. The benefits of a single-payer universal health care system would be numerous. First, the number of uninsured would decrease to zero. Universal Health Care in the US Lora Cicconi and Kerri Strug Poverty & Prejudice: Social Security at the Crossroads May 25, Compared to other Western countries, the United States spends more per capita on health care than any other nation.

If the U.S. adopted a Universal Health plan, all Americans would be covered by public health. Ultimately, the United States remains one of the only advanced industrialized nations without a comprehensive national health insurance system and with little prospect for one developing under.

If this type of healthcare system is implemented in the United States, every resident would be covered for all medically necessary services, such as doctor’s visit, preventive treatment, hospital stays, mental health treatment, long-term care, dental care, reproductive health care, prescription drugs, vision care, and medical supply costs.

Should the US Adopt a National Health Care Plan? | GU Journal of Health Sciences