Writing an i am poem readwritethink trading cards

A meeting place for a world of reflective writers. FromI was, and always thought I would be, a kindergarten teacher. In SeptemberI made the move to third grade, trading in labeling pictures for literary essays eek! My son, Alex, will be starting kindergarten this coming September, and I find myself thinking back to what I did to help those four and five year old emergent writers.

Writing an i am poem readwritethink trading cards

We began to discuss the whole idea of fairness and justice in the stories we are reading. We are working on developing empathy and compassion for our main characters. We discussed many important critical issues including are our characters being portrayed fairly and accurately as well as treating each other fairly.

Today, we will specifically focus on the gender issue. In other words, how are male and female characters represented and are they being depicted or shown fairly and accurately? Role of gender in literature. Yesterday we began discussing the whole idea of fairness and justice in the stories we are reading.

We discussed many important issues including if characters are portrayed fairly and accurately as well as treating each other fairly.

Today we will focus specifically on the gender issue. Thinking about gender involves thinking about how male and female characters are represented.

Interactive Learning and Reading Activities for Students in Grades PreK-8 | Scholastic

There are several elements for us to focus on: We need to think about who is looking and who is being looked at. There is the stereotype that think, tall, great hair and great clothes equals a great person. These are the qualities that girls may aspire to or boys admire. Even in books without visual images, the author paints pictures in our minds about the main characters.

We want to ask ourselves, what characteristics are used to describe the main character?

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Pretty, ugly, thin, fact, hunchback, etc. How is he or she treated by others based on their looks? It is not fair for females to always be vulnerable; it is not fair always for males to be strong. How strong is your main character? Is this trait admired by others in the story?

After students complete the Trading Card Research worksheet, they are then ready to use the online interactive ReadWriteThink Trading Card Creator Program for educational purposes. Click here to go to ReadWriteThink's online Trading Card Creator Program for educational purposes. 0 Down votes, mark as not useful. list2. Uploaded by apialphabetnyc.com alphabetnyc.com?ar_a=1alphabetnyc.com

Why or why not? Male characters are usually the ones who do things, have gumption, nerve, chutzpah, who make projects, have strong goals and accomplishments. Female characters often wait for other people to get them going or they respond to what males or adults are doing. Think about if the main character is encouraged to have strong goals and be strong willed and ambitious.

Does this fit in with the role the male or female is supposed to have in society? Male characters are often the ones whose actions are central to the story. Even when a girl is the main character, she may seem merely a substitute for a male stereotype—physically strong, action oriented or fantastically heroic think of some of the Disney films—Pocohantas, Ariel, etc.

Think about who is central to your story. Describe how the central character is being shown. Is your character allowed to be combinations of various qualities—for instance both strong and sensitive?Warning: As you click on the links below, you are leaving the Cobb County/Garrison Mill Website.

writing an i am poem readwritethink trading cards

Students love mad libs for their fun, silly stories. A great way for students to practice parts of speech. | Language Arts Resources - Technology Lessons 4 Teachers. BibMe Free Bibliography & Citation Maker - MLA, APA, Chicago, Harvard. BibMe Free Bibliography & Citation Maker - MLA, APA, Chicago, Harvard.

1) Teacher: Create a transparency sheet with a blank or partially completed character trading card projected onto an overhead screen. Use a "think aloud" type process to fill out the character trading card in front of the alphabetnyc.com?id=initiative_ MsJordanReads Literacy Resources | Literacy resources, classroom ideas, and teaching tips.

A big focus on reading, writing, fluency, and technology. Make your own trading cards using iPads in the classroom | A blog post sharing ideas for using the ReadWriteThink trading card apps with your students to create trading cards.

| Create trading.

Mad Libs Junior from Funbrain | Language Arts R